BangShi announcement:Bangshi Electronic Technology Co. Ltd……

Technical files

Home > Technical files
 
CCTV TermsDownload

CCTV Terms 

AGC 

Automatic Gain Control. .A circuit for automatically controlling amplifier gain in order to maintain a constant 

output voltage with a varying input voltage within a predetermined range of input-to-output variation.

For security camera(bangahi-camera) with AGC,that is also very important .

Aperture 
In television optics, it is the effective diameter of the lens that controls the amount of light reaching the

 photoconductive or photoemitting image pickup sensor. 

Aperture Correction 

Compensation for the loss in sharpness of detail because of the finite dimensions of the image elements

 or the dot-pitch of the monitor. 

Aspect Ratio 

The ratio of width to height for the frame of the televised picture. 4:3 for standard systems, 5:4 for 1K x 1K, 

and 16:9 for HDTV. 

Attenuation 
In general terms, a reduction in signal strength. 
Auto White Balance 

A system for detecting errors in color balance in white and black areas of the picture and automatically adjusting

the white and black levels of  the red ,green and blue signals as needed for correction. Some camera not only  set up auto white balance function ,but  also provides manual white balance (like zoom camera) adjustment.

Auto Light Range 

The range of light, e.g., sunlight to moonlight, over which a TV camera is capable of automatically operating at 

specified output. 

Automatic Brightness Control 
In display devices, the self-acting mechanism which controls brightness of the device as a function of surrounding light. 
Automatic Frequency 
An arrangement whereby the frequency of an oscillator is automatically maintained within specified limits. 
Automatic Iris Lens 
A lens that automatically adjusts the amount of light reaching the imager. 
Automatic Light Control 

The process by which the illumination incident upon the face of a pickup device is automatically adjusted 

as a function of scene brightness. 

Bandwidth 

The number of cycles per second (Hertz) expressing the difference between the lower and upper limiting frequencies 

of a frequency band; also, the width of a band of frequencies. 

Bar Test Pattern 

Special test pattern for adjusting color TV receivers or color encoders. The upper portion consists of vertical 

bars of saturated colors and white. The power horizontal bars have black and white areas and I and Q signals. 

Blooming 

The defocusing of regions of the picture where the brightness is at an excessive level, due to enlargement of 

spot size and halation of the fluorescent screen of the cathoderay picture tube. In a camera, sensor element saturation 

and excess which causes widening of the spatial representation of a spot light source. 

Bounce 
Sudden variations in picture presentation (brightness, size, etc.,) independent of scene illumination. 
Brightness 

The attribute of visual perception in accordance with which an area appear to emit more of less light.

 (Luminance is the recommended name for the photo-electric quantity which has also been called brightness.) 

Broadband 
In television system use, a device having a bandpass greater than the band of a single VHF television channel. 
Burned-In-Image 

Also called burn. An image which persists in a fixed position in the output signal of a camera tube after the camera has 

been turned to a different scene or, on a monitor screen. 

CCD (420/480/600/650 TVL)
 Charge Coupled Device .The CCD is the image sensor of the security camera. The lens focuses reflected light onto the surface of the CCD chip and photo diodes within the chip produce an electrical charge proportional to the amount of light falling onto them.
C Mount 
A television camera lens mount of the 16 mm format, 1 inch in diameter with 32 threads per inch. 
CCTV (BANGSHI CCTV)
Common abbreviation for Closed-Circuit Television. 

Chroma 
That quality of color which embraces both hue and saturation. White, black, and grays have no chroma. 
Chroma Control 
A control of color television receiver that regulates the saturation (vividness) of colors in a color picture. 
Chroma Detector 

Detects the absence of chrominance information in a color encoder input. The chroma detector automatically 

deletes the color burst from the color encoder output when the absence of chrominance is detected. 

Chromatic Aberration 

An optical defect of a lens which causes different colors or wave lengths of light to be focused at different distances

 from the lens. It is seen as color fringes or halos along edges and around every point in the image. 

Chromaticity 

The color quality of light which is defined by the wavelength (hue) and saturation. Chromaticity defines all the qualities

 of color except its brightness. 

Chrominance 
A color term defining the hue and saturation of a color. Does not refer to brightness. 
Chrominance Signal 
That portion of the NTSC color television signal which contains the color information. 
Clamp 
A device which functions during the horizontal blanking or synchronizing interval to fix the level of the picture 
signal at some predetermined reference level at the beginning of each scanning line. 
Clamping 
The process that established a fixed level for the picture level at the beginning of each scanning line. 
Clipping 
The shearing off of the peaks of a signal. For a picture signal. This effects the positive (white). 
Coaxial Cable (RG59 75-3/75-4/75-5)
A particular type of cable capable of passing a wide range of frequencies with very low signal loss. Such a cable
 in its simplest form, consists of a hollow metallic shield with a single wire accurately placed along the center 
of the shield and isolated from the shield. 
Color Burst 
That portion of the composite color signal, comprising a few cycles of a sine wave of chrominance subcarrier frequency, 
which is used to establish a reference for demodulating the chrominance signal. Normally approximately 9 cycles of 3.579545 MHz. 
Color Edging 
Extraneous colors appearing at the edges of colored objects, and differing from the true colors in the object. 
Color Encoder 
A device which produces an NTSC color signal from separate R, G, and B video inputs. 
Color Fringing 
Spurious colors introduced into the picture by the change in position of the televised object from field to field. 
Color Purity 
The degree to which a color is free of white or any other color. In reference to the operation of a tri-color picture tube it refers to the production of pure red, green or blue illumination of the phosphor dot face plate. 
Color Saturation 
The degree to which a color is free of white light. 
Color Sync Signal 
A signal used to establish and to maintain the same color relationships that are transmitted. 
Color Transmission 
The transmission of a signal which represents both the brightness values and the color values in a picture. 
Composite Video Signal 
The combined picture signal, including vertical and horizontal blanking and synchronizing signals. 
Compression ()
The reduction in gain at one level of a picture signal with respect to the gain at another level of the same signal. 
Contrast 
The range of light to dark values in a picture or the ratio between the maximum and minimum brightness values. 
Contrast Range 
The ratio between the whitest and blackest portions of television image. 
Convergence 
The crossover of the three electron beams of a three-gun tri-color picture tube. This normally occurs at the plane of the aperture mask. 
Crosstalk 
An undesired signal from a different channel interfering with the desired signal. 
dB 
Basically, a measure of the power ratio of two signals. In system use, a measure of the voltage ratio of two signals, 
provided they are measured across a common impedance. 
Decoder 
The circuitry in a color TV receiver which transforms the detected color signals into a form suitable to operate 
the color tube. 
Definition 
The fidelity of a television system to the original scene. 
Depth of Field 
The in-focus range of a lens or optical system. It is measured from the distance behind an object to the distance in front of 
the object when the viewing lens shows the object to be in focus. 
Depth of Focus 
The range of sensor-to-lens distance for which the image formed by the lens is clearly focused. 
Digital Signal Processing 
An algorithm within the camera that digitizes data (the image). Examples include automatic compensate for 
backlight interference, color balance variations and corrections related to aging of electrical components or lighting. 
Functions such as electronic pan and zoom, image annotation, compression of the video for 
network transmission, feature extraction and motion compensation can be easily 
and inexpensively added to the camera feature set. 
Distortion 
The deviation of the received signal waveform from that of the original transmitted waveform. 
Distribution Amplifier 
A device that provides several isolated outputs from one looping or bridging input, and has a sufficiently high input
 impedance and input-to-output isolation to prevent loading of the input source. 
Dynamic Range 
The difference between the maximum acceptable signal level and the minimum acceptable signal level. 
EIA Sync 
The signal used for the synchronizing of scanning specified in EIA Standards RS-170, RS-330, RS-343, or subsequent issues. 
Equalizer 
An electronic circuit that introduces compensation for frequency discriminative effects of elements within 
the television system, particularly long coaxial transmission systems. 
Fiber Optics 
Also called optical fibers or optical fiber bundles. An assemblage of transparent glass fibers all bundled together 
parallel to one another. The length of each fiber is much greater than its diameter. This bundle of fibers has 
the ability to transmit a picture from one of its surfaces to the other around curves and into otherwise inaccessible places 
with an extremely low loss of definition and light, by a process of total reflection. 
Field 
One of the two equal but vertically separated parts into which a television frame is divided in an interlaced system 
of scanning. A period of 1/60 second separates each field start time. 
Field of View 
The maximum angle of view that can be seen through a lens or optical instrument. 
FireWireTM 
FireWire is a standarized serial com unications bus similar to USB that allows digital devices to communicate 
with each other at high speeds. It operates at 400 Megabits per second abd can connect up to 63 devices, 
such as cameras, disk drives, computers, and associated hardware. It has no need for a host controller; 
rather each device on a system can operate on its own, but must follow strict rules about when it can talk. 
Focal Length 
Of a lens, the distance from the focal point to the principal point of the lens. 
Focal Plane 
A plane (through the focal point) at right angles to the principal point of the lens. 
Focal Point 
The point at which a lens or mirror will focus parallel incident radiation. 
Footcandle 
See lumen/ft 2. 
Footlambert (FL) 
A unit of luminance equal to 1/candela per square foot or to the uniform luminance at a perfectly diffusing 
surface emitting or reflecting light at the rate of one lumen per square foot. A lumen per square foot is 
a unit of incident light and a footlambert is a unit of emitted or reflected light. For a perfectly reflecting 
and perfectly diffusing surface, the number of lumens per square foot is equal to the number of footlamberts. 
Frame 
The total area, occupied by the television picture, which is scanned while the picture signal is not blanked. 
Frame Frequency 
The number of times per second that the frame is scanned. The U.S. standard is 30 frames per second. 
Frame Transfer 
A CCD imager where an entire matrix of pixels is read into storage before being output from the camera. 
Differs from Interline Transfer where lines of pixels are output 
Frequency Interlace 
The method by which color and black and white sideband signals are interwoven within the same channel bandwidth. 
Frequency Response 
The range of band of frequencies to which a unit of electronic equipment will offer essentially the same characteristics. 
Front Porch 
The portion of a composite picture signal which lies between the leading edge of the horizontal blanking pulse 
and the leading edge of the corresponding sync pulse. 
f/Stop 
Also called F Number and F System. Refers to the speed or ability of a lens to pass light. 
It is calculated by dividing the focal length of the lens by its diameter. 
Gain 
An increase in voltage or power, usually expressed in dB. 
Gamma 
A numerical value, or the degree of contrast in a television picture, which is the exponent of that power law 
which is used to approximate the curve of output magnitude versus input magnitude over the region of interest. 
Gamma Correction 
To provide for a linear transfer characteristic from input to output device. 
Genlock 
A device used to lock the frequency of an internal sync generator to an external source. 
Ghost 
A spurious image resulting from an echo. 
Gray Scale 
Variations in value from white, through shades of gray, to black on a television screen. The gradations approximate 
the tonal values of the original image picked up by the TV camera. 
Hue 
Corresponds to colors such as red, blue, etcetera. 
Hum 
Electrical disturbance at the power supply frequency or harmonics thereof. 
Image Intensifier 
A device coupled by fiber optics to a TV image pickup sensor to increase sensitivity. Can be single or multi stage. 
Image Plane 
The plane at right angles to the optical axis at the image point. 
Impedance (input or output) 
The input or output characteristic of a system component that determines the type of transmission cable to be used. 
The cable used must have the same characteristic impedance as the component. Expressed in ohms. 
Video distribution has standardized on 75-ohm coaxial and 124-ohm balanced cable.